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More Things to Like About Extreme Heat

1. A fine appreciation for anything that provides shade–even a highway.
2. The most outrageous of outfits is perfectly acceptable as long as it simultaneously is cool and provides protection from the sun.
3. Homemade popsicles.
Last batch–creamy cantelope-orange (pureed cantelope, orange juice concentrate, unsweetened soy milk, no fat greek yogurt); current batch–grape lemonade (whole red and green grapes, juice of fresh lemon, infusion of fresh stevia (could be replaced with water and a little sweetener of your choice); upcoming–minty watermelon lime (watermelon; fresh spearmint leaves; fresh lime juice; sweeten to taste).

Peace and light, E — Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

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Signs Around Town (This One Temporary)

This is a quote on the wall at the Lewis Baltz exhibit at the National Gallery (closing July 31st).

Where I travel, the landscape is often bustling or crowded or fine or grand–though much is spare like Judd’s. Some to love and some not so much. The relationships are perhaps both deep and complex at the level of mind and emotion. At the level of inner wisdom, illuminated by the light of consciousness (when I can maintain it with respect to those things external), though, it is exquisitely simple.

Peace and light, E — Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

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White Heat

By 8:30 this morning, the sky was already an engorged white, thick with heat and humidity. There is no prospect of a thunderstorm for relief. If any come, they will be to the south and east or north and west of the space inside the Beltway. (I am convinced that the pattern of storms parting and dissipating within the Beltway is due to the hot air generated within the Dome).

I walked to work earlier than usual this morning and wore a sleeveless dress, sandals, and a sun hat. The co-worker who shared the elevator was wearing a suit, tie, dark socks, and heavy shoes. A few of the men are brave enough to wear short sleeves or go without the tie, but all are wearing long pants, close-toed shoes, and dark socks. In the cafeteria, people are picking out foods heavy with meat, fat, and sugar. The building is air-conditioned to a temperature for the comfort of those who neither dress nor eat for the weather. In the building, I am wearing a wool cardigan over my weather appropriate dress.

Last year, in response to a call to government workers from the White House for ideas to save money, I suggested that the dress code be changed from “business” attire to seasonally appropriate attire (my sleeveless dress is long and plain and does not expose anything other than my arms; it is perfectly “appropriate” and not beach wear). That way, the temperature in government buildings could be raised a few degrees in summer and lowered in winter, saving millions of dollars in heating and cooling expenses, as well as helping the environment.

It needs to be a policy to wear clothing right for the weather. If it is not policy, those who want to get ahead will continue to believe that there is no possibility of succeeding without wearing the suit and tie/lined skirt and jacket, pantyhose and heels. (Why is it that people believe that our brains focus better when our clothing is uncomfortable?)

I did not get a response. The winner was someone who suggested storing their office’s records electronically–something that is gradually happening every where in any event.

Being seasonally appropriate in our dress and diet can make an enormous difference in our comfort and in our impact on the environment. Same, too, for how we exercise. When it is over 90F, please do not crank up the air conditioning so that you can do a fiery practice. Instead, practice quieter poses. Concentrate on seated poses, cooling pranayama practices, and meditation. Enjoy the invitation to stillness and the fact that by virtue of the heat, you are already warmed up.

Peace and light, E — Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

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Waiting for the Bus (In the Shadow of the Dome)

In some ways, those who live near it just plunk their stuff on the grass and sit and wait, more detached from the long reach that touches just about every one. We can be oblivious to the dome, we can be oblivious of the light of spirit, but both exist and touch us regardless of whether we pay attention. The more we seek to become conscious and to participate, though, the more profound and deep will be our connection to ourselves and others.

Peace and light, E — Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

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This Week’s Garden Highlights

Basil, persimmon tomatoes, plum tomato, saqweet banana pepper, turenip and greens, tricolor carrots (the white are maturing much faster than the orange and the red), anaheim peppwer, okra, jalapeno pepper. (Not shown: grapes, kale, and the three cucumbers I had midweek, one of which still needs to be eaten).

Peace and light, E — Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

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