January Cold

Here’s a picture of the chard I harvested last Wednesday.  I don’t usually harvest that much at a time just to feed myself, but it was harvest Wednesday or let it die back.  I have most of my chard plants in a large rectangular container on my very sunny back deck (not really a deck, but a platform to which the patio stairs are attached).  There’s room for my bay tree to go outside in the warm months and to have a few containers, maybe a chair.  Barely that really.  All it takes, though, is a few containers and a little mindfulness to be eating some fresh greens 10-12 months of the year in our hardiness zone.  It looks like the plants survived the bitter cold last week and will go into leaf again when the temperatures are back in the mid-40s, but I’m not certain of it.  I’ll be patient and observe what happens so in future years I’ll have a more refined gauge of what works and what doesn’t work for different shifts in the weather patterns.  The weather will do what it will; but I can act to adapt in a way that tries not to fight what is.  Dan — how is that chard patch of your in New Bedford?

This morning my harvest was from my refrigerator and cupboard by way of the TPPS, Yes Organic, Farmer’s Market, Whole Foods, and Giant by way of all sorts of places — and this is supposed to be the good, healthy eating.  I took the basic proportions from the back of a box to make muffins that had spelt flour, multi-grain flakes, wheat germ, hemp seeds, currents, flax seed meal, walnuts, chopped fresh apple (it all started with needing to cook the apple), ginger, vegetable oil, baking powder, salt, dehydrated cane (unprocessed sugar), and spices.  No eggs, no dairy even on the back of the box of currents.  By the times I was done transforming them, though I would have enjoyed the original, I’d ended up with the kind of muffin the Vermont-granola-style restaurants name “power” muffins, or “energy” muffins, or maybe “everything” muffins because it is too hard to be descriptive of this many ingredients.  I think they will be good food to carry in pockets when out in the cold for extended periods of time.

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