Tag Archive: urban gardening

Fall Greetings (Web Version of E-Newsletter)

I hope this newsletter finds you all as well as possible. It’s been a time when I’m feeling oh so fully aware of the vagaries of fate, the wildness of being, the play between the wholly unpredictable and the ordinary and expected, and the joys and benefits of aligning with a sense of order to feel healthy, adaptive, and present to what comes our way. I’m feeling that I am at a crossroads (this is partly physical), but I don’t have particular plans.

This summer, I listened to my own teachings, and in the midst of tending to the responsibilities of work and home and community and relationship, I made sure to take the time to to study and practice, including time away with opportunities to see the stars, to watch the sunrise, to walk in the woods, to swim in a lake, and, on the way to and from, to enjoy New York City.

As always, I’ve been reading widely, much of the reading focused on how we communicate and relate, what we dream, and what tools or ideas we might consider for making more efficacious our web of living relationship. In the fall, I’m looking forward to attending a number of weekend yoga workshops to inform my own practice and also going deeper into studying nonviolent communication.

For now, in the midst of this outrageous dance of life and relationship, with all that we cannot control and the unfolding turmoil of climate and society, I think that what is most important to me is to work with dedication and with my best attitude, to do community service and engage fully as a citizen, to laugh and share food with friends, to make art, and to connect the broader ecosystem, even if it is mostly through my little garden and the trees and the sky of the city. I meditate and practice asana so that I can live such a life as fully, honestly, joyously, and with as much integrity as I can.

The Tuesday night yoga practice at William Penn House continues as an opportunity to nurture our embodies selves and to share conversation about how the practices can help us live more efficaciously. I love it when new people or those who can only come occasionally join us regulars. It is generally all level and suggested donation, with all proceeds going directly to support the work camp program at William Penn House. This summer, William Penn House work campers constructed dozens of vegetable gardens for neighbors throughout the city, sharing the joys of urban edible gardening with and making possible healthier eating for those who otherwise might not have had access. Do come join us on a Tuesday night if you can. More experienced yogis can inquire directly about the Wednesday night house practice.

If you want to get more regular communications, do consider subscribing to the blog to get an email version of what I post–most days that will come as a photo or a few words, every once and a while, something longer–mostly somehow about or informed by my own interpretation of yoga practice and philosophy. Feel free also to join me on Facebook.

Peace and light,

Elizabeth

ps The murti of Nataraja was a present just given to me by a friend.  He’d brought it back from India a couple of years ago and thought it belonged more in my home than in his at present.  I hadn’t seen one that I’d want to bring home, but he’s dancing away on my bookcase.

Nataraja

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A Good Week for Sadhana

This morning, when I was reviewing in my head some of the meetings and other work matters upcoming this week, I thought, “what a good time to practice all the things I have been studying.”

It felt like progress to think that and then notice my first thought was not, “this week is going to be awful,” or even, “this week is going to be challenging,” instead of thinking the latter and reminding myself of the former.

And having a homemade popsicle after a long day certainly helps make this heat wave more enjoyable.

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Lime, cucumber, mint popsicle (cucumber and mint from the garden)

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State of the Garden (and Pesto)

What I harvested between a morning thunderstorm and starting my day’s work.  Pesto for dinner was not optional.  Along with the basil, I used leaves from the celery and some of the scallion greens, along with garlic from a friend’s garden.  Instead of pine nuts, I used a combination of hemp hearts and walnuts, which together give a similar smoothness as pine nuts, but nutritionally richer and much less expensive.

morning harvest

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Morning Puja

This morning, after I stretched and then sat for meditation, I went out in the garden.  I watered and weeded.  I picked greens and herbs and cherry tomatoes to bring to work as part of my lunch.

I usually work from home on Friday, but had to go in for an intense series of meetings.

I picked these glorious turnips for our office administrative assistant.  She is now the only support person in our office, and she is thus unsupported herself.  She enjoys when I share edibles from the garden.

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State of the Garden (and a Dinner for Friends)

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Garden greens with baby carrots and sprouted beluga lentils, with Dijon mustard vinaigrette; spring onion and quinoa torte with eggs from my friend’s hens. Black olives, roasted soy nuts for salad as diners choose, tarragon and mint to refresh palate.  Cool herbal infusion (peppermint, spearmint, anise hyssop, and lemon balm). Wine and dessert not shown.

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