Art and Culture

No. 9

Friend, yogini, and neighbor Jess will be performing a Beethoven program with the Capitol Hill Chorale this weekend.  A friend asked if I wanted to have dinner on Sunday, and I suggested we instead go to the Atlas Theater to see the concert.  “Great idea,” replied my friend, “I have a friend in the Chorale, too.”  Support the local arts, businesses, and friends, and get entertainment that doesn’t require getting in a car (or at least a very short ride) or a plane.  Come join us!

Share

Mercury in Retrograde (and unsolicited opportunities)

Mercury is in retrograde again.  I harbor some scepticism about its powers, but I did come home to a computer that refused to turn on properly, instead showing me what an information technology friend of mine calls the “blue wall of death.”  Being without my own computer gives me a great opportunity to practice not being attached.  Experiencing classic symptoms of an astrological phenomenon also gives me a opportunity to contemplate the relationship between myth and superstition and “reality.”  The computer crash has also given me an opportunity to contemplate whether to cave in to a yearning for the unnecessary, but no doubt good fun brand new laptop of my dreams (not that I have spent much time dreaming of laptops, but as I am a product of this society, the inevitable thought path following a crashed computer episode includes thinking about whether getting a new computer would be better than fixing the old one).

Share

Why Study Yoga? (and Pete Seeger’s 90th)

In the session yesterday, in discussing the Siva Sutras, Paul Muller-Ortega said that the whole of the teachings are in the very first sutra, even in the first word (caitanyam — consciousness).  For students who, on hearing the first word from their teacher,  say “got it, I understand fully,” no further teaching is necessary.  For the students who say, “please explain further, what does it mean?” more elaboration is needed.

What does it mean, though, to “get it?”  What do we do with the teachings of yoga?  How do we integrate them into our lives?  I practice and study yoga because it is teaching me how to be stronger, more flexible, more grounded, and better able to serve.  Some people I know already have that.  They are already living the yoga, so they do not need the details and the practices.

As a reminder of one who has been living a rich, full life of service and love, enjoy this video of Pete Seeger in honor of his 90th birthday.  (If you cannot see this link, please just do a search for videos, using your favorite search engine.)

Share

Icarus? (and a sense of wonder)

I still have the sense of the miraculous that I could have woken up in my own bed at a reasonable hour and then had lunch in Denver with my friend Robert on the same day.  I am not sure that flying itself has the hubris of Icarus, but not marveling at it and complaining of relatively minor delays and discomfort to be able to shift one’s place in space so quickly, that is a different story.

In another world or time, most of what we take for granted would be thought magic.  My sitting here at the computer and sending these words out is its own magic, as was turning on the lights and taking a hot shower in my room.

What will seem magical and wondrous for you today?

Share

Louise Bourgeois at the Hirshhorn

The other day, I went to see the Louise Bourgeois retrospective at the Hirshhorn.  The works are a combination of exquisite technique and in-your-face, challenging emotions.  I had a friend who raged at me once because I had created a piece that was radically, polemically feminist.  “That’s not art; art is only meant to be beautiful and aesthetic, not to be political,” said my friend.  Although he could not have questioned Bourgeois as an artist — her technique is too good — he might still have raged at it.  (The high school group being shown art on a field trip, while I was at the exhibit, was scurried through a room or two, much to my amusement).

Seeing the exhibit led me to think of the purported purpose of left-handed tantric practices, which are meant to challenge us, turn us upside-down and inside out, and question what we recognize as the divine.

Share

Parama Shiva Tattva (playlist from class)

Per Pam’s request, here’s the Shiva-themed (with a little Ganesha {son of Shiva} and Bhuvaneshwari {Adi Parashakti inseparable from Shiva} included)  playlist from Saturday’s class:

  • Om Shiva, Chloe Goodchild, from Sura
  • Hey Shiva Shankara, Dave Stringer, from Japa
  • Shiva Shambo, Bhagavan Das, from Now
  • Son of Shiva, MC Yogi, from Elephant Power
  • Om Mata, Ragani, from Best of Both Worlds
  • Dancing with the Goddess, Atman, from Eternal Dance
  • Namah Shivayah, Krishna Das, from Live on Earth
  • Hara Shiva Shankara, Jai Uttal, from Spirit Room

Enjoy.  Practice.  Dance.  Sing.

Share

Be Careful

what you wish for.  Or at least enjoy it when you get it.  I’ve been praying for rain.  It was supposed to come yesterday afternoon, then last night.  And it did not, and I worried about another storm passing to the northwest or southeast of us again.  (We are, in fact, getting alot less rain from this storm than originally predicted).

Now, this morning, when it is time for me to walk the ten blocks to the metro to teach class at Willow Street, it is pouring.  It has been so dry I am grateful for the rain.  So I’ll have to dress right and enjoy the wetness for its nourishment and not whine about the cold, damp discomfort.  Darn!  Sometimes it is more fun to whine.

Share

Moksha

I have a set of cards that I keep on my altar that are designed to be used for contemplation.  There are about fifty cards, each of which has a sanskrit word and its meaning.  Just as one gets a fortune cookie randomly or picks a tarot card from a deck, but the message often seems right on point, the word that arises from the card picked from the stack often seems uncannily timely.  Early Saturday morning, after not having used the cards in a few months, I picked a card from the middle of the stack to see if it would help guide my contemplation and meditations as I was getting ready to say good-bye to Becky. The word on the card I picked blind from the middle of the stack was “moksha” or liberation.  In classical yoga, moksha does carry with it the implication of being liberated by transcending body and mind.

Later on Saturday, when I was on my way home from teaching for the appointment with the vet, I stopped at the metaphysical supply shop for a piece of rose quartz (to use in a ritual to assist with the transition and loss that a friend taught me).  At the check out were “dolphin saying cards.”  There was a sign next to the cards inviting customers to take one for free.  The sign also said that it was not necessary to take the one at the top.  The cards were face down; I did not look for a particular saying.  I dug a few cards down, and the one I selected read:  “freedom has its roots within yourself.”  In other words, “moksha” for the second time on this day, when I was facing with Becky her transition of the spirit from the body.

Was it a message?  Was it a coincidence?  I do know that I knew when it was time, as I did with Henrietta.  Becky just did not want to be embodied anymore.  When I held her in her arms after she stopped breathing, she was released and relaxed in a way she had not been in months.  That the signs were saying “moksha” resonated with Becky’s power and connectedness.  I hope that when I am ready to go, I will truly understand moksha, that I will be released.  It is so resonant of Becky’s life, for all her quirks, that she was still teaching me even as she was dying.

Share